Oldest San Francisco Arts Nonprofit Suspends Curatorial Programs

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Gallery view of Jenny O’Dell’s ‘Infrastructure’ (February—March 2014) at Intersection for the Arts, curated by Kevin B. Chen (photograph by Dorothy Santos)

There is so much more to say about this issue. As an SF native, I have been a patron and supporter of Intersection for the Arts for a long time. I recently published a news story on the online arts publication Hyperallergic. If you would like to join the conversation, please feel free to leave a comment on the Hyperallergic site or consider joining the open group on Facebook called After Intersection. I wish I could say “enjoy” this write-up, but it’s more to share the news on a national platform and help spread the word about how we as a community can better support and keep apprised of our beloved grassroots arts organizations. Thanks so much for reading. Please share widely.

Master’s Thesis Project ~ Narratives of Marginalized Bodies: Exploring Third Space in Contemporary New Media and Digital Art

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FINALLY! My thesis is done. Please click on the symposium poster image above to access the Graduate Thesis Work 2014 site brought to you by the California College of the Arts. You will be able to read my thesis abstract there and learn a bit more about my overall project. If you want further details or read it (goddess bless you because I have NO idea who would want to read it other than my committee and fellow cohort – because they were required to read it!), please feel free to contact me via the contact form on this blog site or the email provided on the CCA grad site. Thank you!!

Beyond the Studio: What Do Artists/Writers/Curators Need? by Christian L. Frock

Please take some time to visit KQED Arts today. I am honored to be included in Christian L. Frock‘s piece “Beyond the Studio: What do Artists/Writers/Curators Need?” I highly encourage reading through the thoughtful responses from members of the arts community such as Anuradha VikramMegan WilsonChristine Wong YapElizabeth TravelslightMatthew Harrison TedfordTaraneh HemamiMatt Sussman, and Rhiannon E MacFadyen. It would be great for you, dear reader, to answer the question as well by leaving a comment.

Trust me, it’s a great conversation and much-needed. Lastly, I agree with Christian when she says, “Figuring out what artists need isn’t complicated — start by listening.”

SFAQ // International Arts and Culture // Issue 16 // May – July 2014

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Feeling incredibly honored to be a part of the latest edition of SFAQ. The issue is focused on arts and technology. I contributed answers to Peter Dobey’s article, “What is Arts and Technology?”.  Some of the other contributors to the piece include an all star line-up of community leaders, educators, and creatives such as Ben Valentine, Willa Köerner, Ian Alexander Adams, DC Spensley, Hanna Ragev, Sheena Vaidyanathan, and Marcella Faustini.

One of the questions we were asked was, “What does the relation {art, technology} mean for our time?” Here’s my answer to the first question,

Intersectionality. The idea of art and technology means an in-between space that has yet to even be defined. This sounds incredibly abstract, but it’s the first thing that comes to mind. Starting with the Experiements in Arts and Technology (E.A.T.) collaborative group formed in the 1960s by artists and engineers including Robert Rauschenberg and Billy Klüver, the intersection of artistic practices with engineering and technology was in its nascent stages. These individuals were discovering what the other discipline could offer and what skills they could learn from one another. Art and technology also means convergence. Historically, artists and technologists seemed like such separate disciplines. But in contemporary art practices, digital technologies and programming languages are starting to become more common tools for creatives expression themselves.