Reflections and Chemistry

It’s that time of the week again! Re-blog Mondays because my brain is still thinking about the weekend and re-adjusting and re-directing my brain cells to writing projects and assignments for the week.

This week’s re-blog post hails from the Rocketblog (aka Rocket Grants)! This particular post is about the Bay Area’s very own, Art Practical. Patricia Maloney, AP founder, and her staff took a trip out to Kansas City to meet artists and writers from the region. Art Practical was awarded a Rocket Grant to work with expanding the Kansas City artists network through a series of writings that will focus on Rocket Grants artists. Please check out the post to learn more about this unique partnership!!

Rocket Grants

WOW! What an amazing weekend!  The untiring curiosity, gravitas, humor, intelligence and kindness of the visiting Art Practical team were simply inspiring. Patricia Maloney, Victoria Gannon, Christian L. Frock and Elyse Mallouk kept up an intense schedule to meet with as many institutions and artists as possible in their brief 3-day stay in Kansas City, and throughout it all they somehow maintained their determination to be just as fresh and present for the last encounter as the first.

The public program at KCAI and the Rocket Grants brunch at PLUG Projects (see the slide show) were a provocative opportunity for us all to examine our own arts community in both an objective and introspective way. The metaphors that immediately came to mind to describe the roles that AP performed here were those of a mirror and a catalyst. But this is not really accurate because those two agents…

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Author: Dorothy R. Santos

Dorothy R. Santos is a writer, editor, curator, and educator whose research areas and interests include new media and digital art, activism, artificial intelligence, networked culture, and biotechnology. Born and raised in San Francisco, California, she holds Bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the University of San Francisco, and received her Master’s degree in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the Arts. She is currently the managing editor for Hyphen magazine. Her work appears in art21, Art Practical, Daily Serving, Rhizome, Hyperallergic, and Public Art Dialogue. She has lectured and spoken at the De Young museum, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Stanford University, School of Visual Arts, and more. Her essay “Materiality to Machines: Manufacturing the Organic and Hypotheses for Future Imaginings,” has been published to The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture in 2016. She serves as executive staff for the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism, board member for the SOMArts Cultural Center, and teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz in the Digital Art and New Media department.

2 thoughts on “Reflections and Chemistry”

  1. I took a peek at “Discrete Curiosities”. It makes me think of the Moebius Band, the Klein Bottle, an opera house, a laundry hamper, spiders’ webs, and hard and sheer objects and things.

    And then at the bottom (is this discrete?) a group or chain of resistor-looking objects in several strands that connect from a master resistor-looking lime-green object, which probably could form one unbroken line if all spread out.

    Looking and reading all this creative stuff sometimes makes me feel insignificant. But it pleasures me to continue to do so, not just because of this person’s blog, but because it is soul-stirring in its own way. You can’t just look at- well, at least I- without being somewhat intimidated.

    This will literally form in my brain more dendrites, more brain cells, and increase intelligence, which I sure need a whole bunch of to help me and my little business.

    Hmm- Kansas, Dorothy, the Yellow Brick Road…

    1. Thanks so much for checking out the Rocket Grants Blog. They’re a wonderful organization with a bevy of talented artists. I’m super stoked that the Art Practical, online art journal, team is partnering with the Kansas City Artists Community. To be honest, tonight was the first time I checked out “Discrete Curiosities”. Similar to all of the things you mentioned, there is a taxonomy that we all create. Individually and collectively to understand our world. I think when artists and scientists get together to investigate this idea around objects (whether they are intended to be art objects and/or functional objects), it’s a wonderful way for the lay person to get engaged and question as well. This is one of the functions of artworks. Art works ought to lead to an experience of art, investigation, and questioning.

      I wanted to address something you wrote, “Looking and reading all this creative stuff sometimes makes me feel insignificant”. I write and read about art on a daily basis. At first, when I made a commitment to myself to be engaged in the arts, the community, and the rigor of research and writing, I felt overwhelmed. However, over time, I’ve realized that everything I don’t know is an opportunity to know. A revealing of something beautiful or strange or unique. This is why art is my passion, my love. It never disappoints me and constantly challenges me.

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