The Body Organic: Recreating Gesture through Digital Art ~ Part I

 

Art relies on the body as a means to produce. Painting and sculpting are overt examples of the solitary and traditional artist. As the world grows more interconnected through the internet and mobile devices, new media artists are finding ways to incorporate the body as a means of art production. The viewer becomes the participant in the art making. Scott Snibbe takes gesture to an incredible new meaning. From immersive environments to Björk’s latest all app album Biophillia, Snibbe redefines art, technology, interactivity, and connectivity.

At recent UpgradeSF! meeting, Snibbe gave an artist talk and presented well known works including, Björk’s all app album, Gravilux, and Oscilloscoop. Although the aforementioned are applications meant for mobile devices, Snibbe’s larger installations entail use of the entire body to create works that emphasize articulations of the body to construct unique experiences for each viewer. As Snibbe discussed his philosophy and practice, the presentation brought an interesting quandary. Is the new media artist able to divorce language from their work? With language playing an imperative role in creative coding, is this one of the hurdles new media arts present to the general public regarding the definition and evolution of art?

Originally published to zero1 blog. Please view post here

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Author: Dorothy R. Santos

Dorothy R. Santos (b. 1978) is a Filipina-American writer, editor, curator, and educator whose research interests include new media and digital art, activism, artificial intelligence, and biotechnology. Born and raised in San Francisco, California, she holds Bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the University of San Francisco, and received her Master’s degree in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the Arts. She serves as one of the editors-in-chief for Hyphen magazine. Her work appears in art21, Art Practical, Daily Serving, Rhizome, Hyperallergic, and SF MOMA's Open Space. She has lectured at the De Young museum, Stanford University, School of Visual Arts, and more. Her essay “Materiality to Machines: Manufacturing the Organic and Hypotheses for Future Imaginings,” was published in The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture (2016). She is currently a Yerba Buena Center for the Arts fellow researching the concept of citizenship. She also serves as executive staff for the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism and board member for the SOMArts Cultural Center.

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