Silencing the Conscious: The Representation of the API Body in Ex Machina // published in Hyphen

ex_machina

The plot line dictates, culturally and historically, a dominant narrative told many times in film and media. I wish it were different. With the myriad of racial, cultural, and social stories flooding the media, visibility of API bodies is still so very far behind in the mainstream culture even when it is inserted into film as an aside.

From two teenage boys creating a women in the 1980s film Weird Science to a robotics scientist creating a Voice Input Child Identicant (VICI) in cult classic sitcom Small Wonder, the impact of robotics and artificial intelligence on the human condition isn’t anything new. The profound interest in artificial intelligence has gained popularity with surrealist images of Google’s AI perceiving images in nature to self-driving cars. The rapid development in the realms of science enhance existing technologies to make our lives convenient. But the dominant narratives persist in popular culture as seen in the Alex Garland’s directorial film debut in Ex Machina. Since the release of the film, critics laud the triumph of soft spoken and seemingly delicate feminine robot Ava. As she speaks to Turing tester, Caleb, a programmer for Bluebook (Google-esque technology company), we realize she is well aware of the surroundings and has even developed qualities of human behavior that mimic her ability to think of ways to escape her captor-maker.

However, the film seemed to backfire as an interpretation of the battle between the sexes. Nathan, maker of Ava, created a female AI based on Caleb’s pornographic preferences, which reminds us that Nathan himself knew to use one of his own employees as a ploy in confirming his abilities and deftness in using programming and coding to materialize his fantasies and desires. The creation of Ava is also a way for Nathan to assert his control over Caleb.

Read the rest of the piece here

Silencing the Conscious: The Representation of the API Body in Ex Machina // published in Hyphen

Upcoming event: NextDayBetter + San Francisco Speaker Series / Saturday, June 20, 2015

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WHERE: SoMa StrEat Food Park
WHEN: Saturday, June 20th, 2015
TIME: 1:00pm-6:00pm
Drinks. Food. Inspiration

To purchase tickets, click here

What will San Francisco look like in in 20 years? What does it look like now? What challenges does the city face? Considering the challenging issues that face San Francisco such as gentrification, poverty, digital and educational inequity, and entrepreneurship. We have asked our speakers to envision a new San Francisco based on history and their experiences. Building on the art of storytelling, each narrator will share what they feel needs to be built and what it will take to activate the community.

Upcoming event: NextDayBetter + San Francisco Speaker Series / Saturday, June 20, 2015

#goals

goals

It’s been over a month and my aspiration of writing more regularly has taken a back seat to the rest of the work and projects I’ve been concentrating on. In any case, I’m going to TRY and consistently bring content onto my blog that not only resonates with me, but with you as well. There are SO many things going on and some incredible projects coming up in the next couple of months and one coming to a close (i.e., working on creative writing project, meeting and editing contributors’ work for the new asterisk magazine, and a well received exhibition). But I have learned, rather quickly, that I can’t afford to burn out due to my inability to say “no.” It’s tough, but I’m learning.

Lessons learned (for the year thus far): I have to respect and honor “me” time (this includes writing for myself and as a creative outlet). I’m trying. In the meantime, I WANT this skill (see GIF).

#goals

The Dissidents, The Displaced, and The Outliers Exhibition

DDO_flyerI should have posted this information earlier. But it’s been incredibly hectic on my end. Tonight was a marvelous way to start off the transbay exhibition titled The Dissidents, The Displaced, and The Outliers. The community came out, spoke to artists, and engaged in some critical conversation about the show’s themes around privacy, surveillance, and gentrification. I hope to see you at the next opening or all the public programming events. Please click here for more info. Please help spread the word.

The Dissidents, The Displaced, and The Outliers Exhibition